Why Are Veterinarians Not Embracing Mobile Devices?

Veterinarian holding iPad besides two curious horses

 

Technological advances in medicine continue at a seemingly breakneck speed. That would certainly include the veterinary field. For example, laser therapy is now employed in veterinary clinics to neuter pets as well as manage their pain—unheard of a decade ago in any scientific consideration.

Yet being tech-involved doesn’t seem to be the case for veterinarians in their relation to mobile devices. Veterinarians—in both personal and professional respects— appear to have not fully entered the fast-paced yet advantageous stream of the Mobile Era.

For instance, in a recent study conducted by qSample using its proprietary veterinarian panel, we found that only 17% of veterinarians utilize their smartphone as the primary device to surf the internet. That is below the general population (21%, according to statistics from Pew Research).

Here is the complete breakdown when it comes to veterinarians and their principal device for going online:

1. Desktop computer (58%)
2. Laptop computer (18%)
3. Smartphone (17%)
4. Tablet (6%)
5. Other (4%)

Why the lag of veterinarians in using mobile devices?

One reason might be that the Mobile Era hasn’t calibrated itself to the veterinarian industry, as presented in the findings of a Journal of Veterinary and Medical Research study.

The study found that there is “a clear need for the development of mobile apps and devices for veterinary medicine.” It also found a lack of widespread use of mobile devices in the veterinarian profession—even if most veterinarians were open to more usable functions in their in mobile devices.

Moreover, the study showed how medical apps were readily available on the internet for download, while veterinary apps were still behind the proverbial times.

In conclusion, the study stated that when it came to smartphones and veterinarians:

The biggest lack is educating veterinarians about the options available and discovery of more technologies that can be widely used to improve the field.

In other words, between a lack of knowledge of apps from veterinarians and a shortage of apps from providers, a void exists when it comes to veterinary mobile device usage. After all, one of the vital functions of smartphones are apps. Consumers spend 85% of the time on smartphones in apps.

In essence: if you build it, they will come. If more apps are designed for veterinary practices and interests, veterinarians will focus more on mobile devices—which are replacing computers when it comes to spending or researching.

Thus, the opportunity to capitalize on veterinarians as mobile consumers is clear: create mobile apps for veterinarians while at the same time educate them on their utilities.

Veterinarian apps are a relatively wide-open field now, even if there are more than three million apps presently available from Google and Apple alone. Even if veterinarian apps flood the market, this will only spark the veterinarian market to catch up with the rest of the world…at least when it comes to mobile devices and the Mobile Era in general.

 

veterinarian and raptor

 

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