Tag Archives: survey

How Young Professionals Affect The Alcohol Industry [Infographic]

As millennials come to age, numerous sectors such as the alcoholic beverage industry are seeing major consumption changes.The professional millennial cohort is the agent of change in this industry.The social work culture with after hours drinks are the new norm for this non-materialistic generation. The digital natives are constantly sharing their life experiences through social media channels and these experiences are shared with alcoholic beverages, representing a social status. With these factors influencing the drinking choices of millennials, the question remain on what type of alcoholic beverage are they consuming and what drinking establishments are they visiting? qSample conducted a survey to understand millennials’ alcoholic beverage preferences. The survey was deployed to more than 500 respondents on their drinking choices and confirmed the correlation between drinking preferences and the generational mindset.

The data shows that 50% of older professional millennials, ages 27-33 are consuming alcoholic beverages in restaurants. In contrast, only 8% percent of this group is consuming alcoholic beverages at home.This highly sociable age demographic combines their social gathering with alcohol consumption.When visiting restaurant establishments, (74%) of older millennials are often ordering alcoholic beverages when dining out. As this demographic enters the peak of their careers, their disposable income increases, given them the ability to spend their income on luxury items such as alcoholic beverages. Despite having increased purchasing power, (37%) of these groups of millennials are choosing drinking establishments with drink specials and affordable drink prices. Within this affordable drinks trend, (54%) of older millennials indicated that they prefer to visit a BYOB restaurant when dining out.On the other hand, more than 48% of millennials professionals are keeping up with trends by choosing drinking establishments based on knowledgeable bartenders/mixologists, drink presentations, and exclusive in-house cocktails.  

Millennials have a wide range of alcoholic preferences, as a consequence, the alcoholic beverage market has seen several consumption changes within this generation. About (27%) of older millennials are choosing to drink beer when dining out, closely following (26%) drink wine and (24%) drink spirits. When visiting BYOB restaurants, (28%) of older millennial prefer to drink beer while the other millennial cohort (29%) prefer to drink wine.   The consumption preferences of this generation can also be seen within their purchasing selections. When asked if they would consider purchasing a bottle of the drink of their choice at a drinking establishment, (97%) of older millennials responded yes. As this group of millennials is more established within their careers their consumption preferences are shifting between drinking beer and purchasing bottles. The strong economic power of older millennials is also presented in how much they are spending on purchasing a bottle when dining out. About (50%) responded that they spend between $40 – $59 on a bottle when dining out.

The alcoholic beverage industry is exponentially growing both in volume and value.As millennials come to age, with their value-conscious behavior, they are constantly challenging the way this industry markets towards their generation. By paying close attention to millennials drinking habits, especially older millennials, alcoholic beverages companies and drinking establishments have a profitable opportunity. Factors such as knowledgable bartenders, drink exclusives, and drink specials are pivotal for millennials when choosing a drinking establishment. Understanding the shifting drinking preferences of this generation and their constant need for social functions will provide a higher value towards a brand.

Ultimately, marketing tactics that are geared towards lifestyle choices and exclusive experiences will drive millennials’ interest. The ultimate goal for alcoholic beverage companies and drinking establishment is to understand the millennial mindset in order to succeed in sales with this generation.

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Behind every trend there is a competitive market and consumer data that might unlock your next big idea. To learn more about these findings please contact sales-team@qsample.com 

 

Survey Accuracy For Actionable Results

 

On July 24th,1824 “The Harrisburg Pennsylvanian” printed a report of a straw vote taken in Wilmington, Delaware. This vote showed some of the early methods used in market research. Although, this event was not market research in itself, it used some of the early methods of market research. However, it was not until 1901 that evidence of market research became frequent enough to indicate that a new business field had made a prominent start. The need for knowledge had several businessmen looking for theories and methods to better understand the market, which ultimately created the market research industry we know today. Market research encompasses numerous methodologies, but the most common one is survey research.

In order to conduct any type of research, it is necessary to have a quality sample of the targeted audience. Reliable sample is pivotal in market research. One of the key factors involving sample is selecting the correct sample size. This is crucial when conducting a study, if a sample size is too big this will lead to a waste of resources. Consequently, not having enough sample will lead to an inaccurate representation of a population. Survey accuracy is another qualifier when attempting to gather quality data. Researchers are constantly asking questions such as, are the results accurate? Is the sample reliable?  There is no magic formula but here are a few things to consider when conducting a survey.

Margin of Error

There are two measurements that affect data accuracy. The first one is the margin of error (or confidence interval). In sum, this is the positive or negative deviation allowed on the survey results for the sample. In other words, is the difference between the opinion of the respondents and the opinion of an entire population. In order to better understand this statistical explanation, suppose that you set a margin of error of 5% on a study you are conducting about soccer. The results of this survey indicate that 90% of the respondents like to play soccer, a 5% margin of error indicates that you can be sure that between 85% (90%-5%) and 95% (90%+5%) of the entire population likes to play soccer.

The second measurement that affects data accuracy is the confidence level. This measurement indicates how often the percentage of a population actually lies between the boundaries of the margin of error. Following the example above, the confidence level tells you how sure you can be that between 85% and 95% of the population likes to play soccer. Suppose that you choose a 95% confidence level,  this interval will indicate that in 95% of the time, between 85% and 95% of the population like to play soccer. A 95% confidence level is standard in quantitative research, since a higher confidence level such as 99% indicates greater accuracy but represents a higher cost.  

After understanding the two measurements that affect data accuracy you can use an online calculator to determine the sample size of a population or you could use the formula presented below.

ss= Z 2 * (p) (1-p)

     ____________

              c 2

Where:

Z = Z value (e.g. 1.96 for 95% confidence level)  

p = percentage picking a choice, expressed as decimal

(.5 used for sample size needed)

c = confidence interval, expressed as decimal

(e.g., .05 = ±5)

Screener Questions

Screener type questions are used to qualify respondents and determine if the respondents are eligible to participate in a research study. For example, when conducting a study on the consumption of alcoholic beverages, a researcher will need respondents who consume alcoholic beverages. Therefore, a screener question should be implemented to eliminate possible respondents that do not consume alcoholic beverages. Consider the question below:

How often do you consume alcoholic beverages?

a) Once a year

b) Once month

c) Every other week

d) Every week

e)  Every day

f) I do not consume alcoholic beverages?

If respondents choose option F the survey will be terminated since the respondent will not qualify to participate in the study. This type of question at the beginning of a survey helps increase data quality.

Data Sanitization

Data sanitization involves the detection and removal of errors and inconsistencies in a data set due to the incorrect entry of the data. Incorrect or inconsistent data can create a number of problems which can lead to the drawing of false conclusions. Therefore, sanitizing a data set can improve the accuracy of survey results but it has to be done with care in order to avoid problems such as, the loss of important information or valid data.  

In sum, there are several elements that dictate survey accuracy. When conducting a survey it is imperative to keep in mind the sample size, margin of error, screening questions and data collection practices to ensure data accuracy and ultimately data quality.

 

Type of Questions To Keep Respondents Engaged

When conducting quantitative research, market researchers and programmers need to be mindful of survey fatigue. This is a problem that occurs when individuals get tired or bored while taking a survey, which often leads to the survey not being completed or terrible data quality. Surveys designed with aesthetically pleasing elements and interactive tools tend to keep respondents’ engaged and reduce survey drop-out rates. In addition to to the aesthetics of the survey, research practitioners can implement dynamic questions with captivating interfaces. These varying question styles foster interaction between the respondents and the survey. Dynamic questions also serve as alternatives to single select, grid, rating and open-ended questions, which often can be tedious and unstimulating for the respondent. Therefore, we have compiled a list of question styles that can add variety to a survey and minimize fatigue.

Slider

Keeping respondents engaged can be achieved by using slider style questions, which allow respondents to answer a question on a scale by dragging an interactive slider. This is an alternative to rating scale questions since users can interact and create unique distinctions through comparisons among related items.

Sliders questions are not as beneficial when there is little to no interrelationship between question topics. For example, when asking a set of attitude statements that are not related.

 In the example, there is no relationship between the three questions options. When using a slider question it is important to understand that respondents will make relative comparisons among related items. If there is no relationship between the items, it will be more beneficial to use another type of survey question such as multiple choice.

Image Heat Map

Another way keep respondents engaged is by using an image heat map question. This type of question allows users to identify the areas they like or dislike about a specific image. This type of question provides flexibility and has a number of potential applications. For example, it can help collect feedback on a new website layout. Using an image heat map facilitates feedback through interactions and sustain user engagement.

Rank Sort

Rank sort questions are another alternative to keep respondents alert and engaged by using visual indicators. This type of question allows respondents to rank items by clicking or dragging them into the desired order. This offers an alternative method to numerical inputs which respondents might find tedious. The use of visual indicators provide the respondent with an interactive experience and can improve survey participation.

Card Sort

Another question style that promotes interaction is card sort questions. This question style serves as an efficient alternative to grid questions, where a list of attributes are rated on a scale. For card sort questions, respondents are shown animated text or images, one at a time. The respondents are able to drag these elements into the desired category. This allows the collection of multiple data points while mitigating fatigue and dropouts.

In sum, survey fatigue is an ongoing problem in the data collection process. When crafting a survey, researchers need to keep in mind their audience and the type of questions needed to minimize survey fatigue. Collecting quality data relies on respondents’ engagement, therefore the use of interactive questions will improve participation rates, minimize dropouts and ultimately keep respondents engaged.

 

In an Evolving Research Landscape, Giving is a Two-way Street

One phrase we often hear repeatedly from research practitioners is that: “Survey participation is declining and online data quality continues to plague the industry.” After investing a great deal of time, resources, and effort, they are often unsatisfied with the quality of data collected for their research. After all, the research is meaningless if the survey results are inadequate. “How can I effectively increase survey participation and data quality,” they want to know, “without extensive data scrub?”

The first area of focus is often the data collection methodology. The next area of focus, naturally, is the instrument – the actual language used in the survey, particularly for online, direct mail, or mobile surveys where no other guidance is available. Survey incentive is usually the last variable that companies look at as a means to boost response rate or to address data quality issues. Given consumers exist in a culture driven by rewards, it should be natural for survey respondents to expect an attractive incentive in exchange for their time – and rightfully so.

Unfortunately, research practitioners and panel companies alike undermine the significant role that incentives play when it comes to data collection. In fact, some researchers view survey incentives as something that could potentially create bias in their data collection efforts, based on the assumption that respondents will not provide honest answers to survey questions and are only driven by the reward.  Although this is not completely incorrect for a small number of research participants, it is, however, not the norm.

As stated earlier, our society is already reward driven. Just look around – in business, in commerce, in our day-to-day life. They are passed off to staff and packaged in wellness programs that encourage pedometer steps and healthy eating habits. They are plaques presented to sales reps reaching quotas. They are the points we earn, the loyalty cards we shuffle in our wallets and the frequent flier miles we stockpile. Even our bonuses and raises are forms of reward and incentive.

In marketing, rewards are indispensable tools. We donate portions of proceeds to causes. We employ games, contests, points, and loyalty cards – all to motivate specific behaviors. Incentives help us broaden word of mouth marketing, increase revenue, shrink advertising cost, expand into new markets, and keep customers coming back for more. Marketers use incentives because they work. So why should this be any different for market research?

Without data, there is no research; without respondents, there is no data; Panel providers must incentivize their respondents fairly and act as good ambassadors for their panelists. Research practitioners, on the other hand, must be realistic and understand that the world has changed. Volunteer survey participants are almost extinct. High earning CEOs or influential individuals receive monetary incentives to give lectures, speeches, or to provide their expert opinions to various organizations. Their opinion is never questioned due to the value of their speaking fees. Survey participation and data quality will continue to plague the research industry until research practitioners understand the value that rewards play in our daily lives. It may be too late for them to realize that without incentives, there are no respondents.

 

 

AI: The Future is Now

 

Comedian TJ Miller, of HBO’s Silicon Valley, performs a standup in which he tells of an entertaining, yet extremely terrifying time in which he suffered a life-threatening brain malformation. He was in the middle of pitching a movie idea when he collapsed to the floor while seizing, and was rushed to the hospital. His story continues, he explains that he suffered from an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) hemorrhage, which is essentially an abnormal connection between the veins and arteries.

When Miller awoke from his coma in the Cedars-Sinai ICU neurology ward, he found a nurse standing over him saying, “Your doctor cannot be here, but a proxy will be here in just a bit.” He then explains how he was given little to no information about his condition. Next thing he knew, what looked like an iPad on a Segway rolled in the room and on the screen, was his doctor, who was video calling from a different location. This robot-doctor then began explaining Miller’s condition and how lucky he was to be alive. Miller, who at this point is more shocked about a robot wheeling into his room and diagnosing him, asks his doctor the humorous yet, understandable question of “…Am I in the future?”

While TJ Miller had only been in a coma for a few days, his question of “Am I in the future?” is certainly one that most of us would wonder. The idea of autonomous Segway-like robots wheeling around hospitals, video-calling to doctors across the country or around the globe sounds like something out of Star Trek or a Kubrick film. These proxies that Miller mentioned are known as telehealth robots and are being integrated into all aspects of hospitals. NBC’s, Julia Boorstin, describes how they can allow a stroke victim to be assessed by a specialist when every minute counts and there isn’t a specialist at the hospital. Telehealth robots increase the standard of care and allow more patients to be seen in less time, thus cutting down on the over-crowding and potentially saving money.

Additionally, robots are seeing an increase in popularity in rural hospitals for more than just improved patient care. For instance, Hamilton County Hospital in Kansas was very close to shutting down when telehealth robotics were brought onto the scene. Their chief executive, Bryan Coffey explained that “we brought in a telemedicine robot and started seeing an 180 (degree change). There’s been a 40 percent increase in (patient) volume and we’re consistently, month over month, 15 percent in growth.” Their investment of $36,000 for the robot yielded a substantial return on their investment leading to greater patient throughput.

These robotics are also being utilized by graduate nursing students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). UAH and other universities that have introduced similar programs are leading the way in terms of telehealth education. They are utilizing this technology to train students from off-site facilities as well as providing online students more of a presence in classrooms and hospitals. The nursing dean at UAH, Marsha Howell Adams explains, “It will allow our graduate students in our nurse practitioner pathways to actually be responsible for the management of the patient care in a simulation scenario.”

The full benefit of the telehealth industry has yet to be seen. In Miller’s case, while he awoke confused to what seemed to be a futuristic robot-doctor, there’s no doubt that the rapid care offered by telehealth robots quite likely saved his life. Telehealth allowed his AVM hemorrhage to be discovered in a timely manner as opposed to being discovered on the autopsy table. Through the advent of technology, a hospital visit can offer immediate care from a specialist on the other side of the country, allowing top-rate care in less time, all with the help of an autonomous robot on wheels – perhaps this is the future.

However, in many ways, it seems natural for robotics, science, and healthcare to merge and progress in this manner. A more noteworthy display of futurism emerges when seemingly far off technology leaves the scientific sphere and spreads into the social and political sphere.

Though perhaps not as visually shocking as a free-roaming robot on wheels that Skypes to doctors in remote locations, the artificial intelligence system known as MogAI is a game changer with far-reaching effects.

MogAI was created by Sanjiv Rai in 2004 and has accurately predicted the past three Presidential elections. According to a CNBC report, it gathers data from over 20 million points from around the internet, including Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube, in order to create its predictions. MogAI works by monitoring social media and internet user engagements to anonymously gather information. It not only accurately predicted the election results, but also noted the fact that Trump would surpass the number of engagements that Obama had in his peak of the 2008 election, long before anyone could have made that prediction.

It’s important to note that these results were not expected. MogAI was not simply going along with media trends or regurgitating expert opinion. This is something different.

So why is MogAI more effective than traditional methods of prediction? It is not limited by human bias or the hesitancy attached to telling a stranger who you are voting for. MogAI monitors social media platforms, uses algorithms and improves with time. This program’s name is referencing Rudyard Kipling’s character, Mowgli, from The Jungle Book. MogAI, like Mowgli learns from interacting with its ever-changing environment.

Per CNBC, Rai explained that, “While most algorithms suffer from programmers/developer’s biases, MoglA aims at learning from her environment, developing her own rules at the policy layer and develop expert systems without discarding any data.” In other words, MogAI is not limited by the human error – it finds the best way of gathering data and does so without interruption. MogAI sifted through reactions of videos of the election process on Facebook and YouTube. It monitors likes and dislikes. It analysis metadata. It considers the opinions of those who only speak up only when hidden behind their online cloak of anonymity. Artificial intelligence systems like this display the pulse of our nation in a way that we have never been able to do before and this form of tech innovation will eventually affect our day-to -day activities in areas that we possibly can’t imagine.

Artificial Intelligence has enormous growth potential and a number of companies in various industries are already adding AI to their playbooks – manufacturing, retail, healthcare, technology, transportation and more. Even in market research, an industry that is often driven by empathy and emotional intelligence, is giving AI some strong attention. Of course, AI is not yet able to address the human aspect of research but some companies are looking beyond these challenges. QuestionPro, a Research Software provider, has recently launched “Locus” – An Artificial Intelligence bot that can help understand what type of survey the user is interested in to help them develop the survey instrument. While “Locus” is still in Beta, it’s a testament to the growing adoption of AI, to improve customer experience. Vivek Bhaskaran, CEO of QuestionPro, explains that “Much like a conversation, Locus will continuously be “trained” to become increasingly effective at communicating with users and maximizing both the quality and efficiency of their QuestionPro experience. Eventually, the Artificial Intelligence Bot will boast even more capabilities within the product.”

The applications for this and other AI prediction systems are staggering. By analyzing data from places such as Facebook Live conversation feeds or Google analytics and then completely anonymizing this information, data predictions can offer fewer privacy violations and more accuracy than ever before in history. It is estimated that the Artificial Intelligence market will be worth $16.2 billion dollars, by 2022. If this estimate is accurate, this 62% compound annual growth rate from 2016 to 2022 is staggering. While a major part of this growth is from the healthcare industry, AI is already making its presence felt in other sectors, as evident by the use of SIRI and Google Assistant in mobile technology. The reality is that AI is already here and its future looks bright. Whether it can take us where no human has gone before remains to be seen.

2016 Presidential Election Infographic

 

American voters are heading to the polls in November to determine for the 58th time their country’s president for the next 4 years. While presidential elections are known to provide good theatre, the 2016 Presidential Election has been filled with some interesting twists and turns, and is undoubtedly one for the ages. The Republican nominee, Donald Trump, whose loose cannon speaking style has created a firestorm even among his own party, is viewed as a social media scandal machine. On the other side, we have Hillary Clinton, a former First Lady, Senator of New York and most recently Secretary of State, who simply can’t seem to shake some of her old ghosts – email issues, wall street and even issues with her own foundation. With less than 5 weeks left before the general election, these two candidates are keeping voters on the edge of their seats.

In order to gauge the pulse of American voters heading into the general election, we conducted two surveys to compare how the opinion of the general US population differs from those in a battle ground state like Florida. The surveys were conducted using qSample’s likely voter panels. More than 450 respondents participated in each survey, with an even split on party affiliation. The data gathered has provided critical insight regarding where voters stand on various issues, when it comes to these two candidates.

The data reveals that despite lack of experience and a series of faux pas made in his presidential campaign, Florida voters are leaning towards Trump (50%-38%) in this upcoming election. However, Secretary Clinton is holding on to a slight lead among the general US population (41%-37%). The data also shows that more than 20% of respondents cited patriotism as the reason they would vote for Trump. While Floridian voters think Trump cares more about the country than Clinton, they also indicated that she has better economic and foreign policy experience than Trump (17%). When comparing the data, both audiences seem to agree on this point – Clinton has more political experience, whereas Trump seems to care more about the country.

Voters from both panels were asked which candidate they feel is more qualified to be president and their feelings on the current state of the country. Florida voters indicated that Trump is as qualified to be president, with both candidates splitting the votes at 42%. This number is not surprising, since Floridians typically vote Republican in general elections. On the flip side, general US voters give Clinton the nod as most qualified to be president by 44%.-37%. Roughly 40% of US respondents indicated that the country is heading in the right direction or about the same direction. Despite a strong job market, universal healthcare and a strong economic recovery, a large portion of the respondents (58%) indicated that the country is not heading in the right direction.

When it comes to how respondents stay up to speed with this year’s election, both panels indicated that they follow the presidential election mainly via television (38%). Print media is not yet dead, at least for presidential elections. More than 21% of respondents in our survey indicated that they follow the election by reading newspapers, followed by social media outlets.

If the trend from 2012 continues, it appears that voters from the battleground state of Florida are leaning to vote Republican in the 2016 Presidential Election. While it will be a tight race, the data shows that the general population will help Hillary Clinton break that glass ceiling.


infographic2-16

Read more about our survey results: 2016 Presidential Election Survey [WordClouds]

For more information regarding the results of these surveys please contact: sales-team@qsample.com

Infographic: 3 Aspects Of A Valid Online Survey

Simplicity and validity. Those two elements make life vibrant, and they pertain to market research. Let’s add visual, and with that trinity your research can potentially be nicely rewarding.

This may seem poetic overkill when it comes to online surveys, but it’s actually essential. As qSample has presented, online survey responses rates are lower than ever, with some studies showing participation rates equating 2%. Additionally, there are more online surveys provided than ever; as an example, Mindshare Technologies conducts 60 million surveys per year, which is a rate of 175,000 a day.

So it’s simple and valid: it’s more competitive than ever and questionnaires need to be as engaging as possible.

The trinity of visual, valid and simple is what we present to you, in an infographic based on our primary and secondary research on implementing suitable online surveys.

I’ll keep it simple and let you at it:

3 Aspects of a Valid Online Survey Infographic

 

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To Understand Market Research You Must Do Yoga

One will find CEOs, entrepreneurs, and Hollywood stars all turning to a new trend: yoga and meditation. After years of skepticism, only recently is this trend seen as a holistic way to cure some of the world’s most common ailments. Yoga has shown to help reduce stress, depression, anxiety, and in some cases chronic back problems. This alleged mysticism has certainly made me a better professional—and I’m not alone in this as yoga is not alone in being backed by medical science.

According to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association, more than 24 million U.S. adults practiced yoga in 2013, up from 17 million in 2008 (making it roughly as popular as golf). Many companies are offering classes to help their employee’s de-stress. In addition, many physicians are recommending it as a pain management treatment.

Yoga can even be looked at as a way to understand market research. Take a minute and get some insight on big market research topics and how one can connect the mind, body, and soul to it.

“I mean the whole thing about meditation and yoga is about connecting to the higher part of yourself, and then seeing that every living thing is connected in some way.” –Gillian Anderson

 

Analyzing The Body

In yoga, one must perform a series of poses. They range from as easy as lying down to as complex as trying to get the feet to touch the forehead while holding a handstand. In all poses, one must always be aware of the body. An individual must analyze his or her body in order to find the depth of a stretch or to what extent the pose can be performed. Yoga poses are deliberate and are meant to push the body to its limits

This is akin to the main findings in big data. When conducting an analysis one must be sure that the data files are consistent with one another. Any inconsistencies (e.g. numbers included) should be explained.

Analyzing data is as well a priority in market research, as it grants the necessary answers to benefit the “body” that is a business. As one does with bodies in yoga, one must also analyze the data, test it to its logical limits, and decipher to results for further “workouts.”

 

Catching The ‘Trap Questions” in The Busy Mind

Meditation and yoga go hand in hand in their goal of a clear path of reasoning. In the typical yoga class, one will persistently hear the instructor coo, “Focus on your body and let everything else go.” Much like trap questions in surveys, this is done so to refocus participants and help keep them on task. Trap questions are safeguards in the form of unrelated questions, sprinkled at certain intervals of the survey. This hopes to adjust the focus of respondents or remove those who have no interest in providing usable data. Like trap questions, yoga uses meditation before and after class to help students focus their attention on their movements.

“I was beginning a journey learning more about myself and, surprisingly, more about business than I learned at one of the top ten business schools in the country and 20 years of professional experience.”

 Mark Hughes, CEO of C3 Metrics, on the benefits of yoga

 

Removing Respondent Bias in The Ego

In Western culture, the word ego refers to characteristics that often make someone seem intolerable in the eyes of others, such as arrogance, selfishness or and an inflated sense of self-importance. One of the goals of yoga is to be able to control and point out when the ego surfaces. When conducting surveys, removing respondent bias is important to gain useful data.

One of the most common biases in surveys (like in our ego) is social desirability. People like to present themselves in a favorable light. They will be reluctant to admit to unsavory attitudes or illegal activities in a survey. Instead, their responses may be biased toward what they believe is socially desirable. Yoga attempts to cut that by preaching that inner acceptance and control of the ego is part of the yogic process.

 

Eliminating Fatigue in The Body

After a day chained to a desk and dealing with outside stresses, yoga is often used to revitalize the body. An evening performing yoga helps release the day’s tensions and fatigue. Like yoga in market research, it is paramount to eliminate respondent fatigue in the survey experience.

Getting information from the participants is important. However, one cannot overload respondents with surveys with long questionnaires, long matrices question blocks, or complicated wording.  While in yoga, the body is always aware of its aches and pains as it stretches and relaxes.

As market research experts, we must also be aware of our participants’ aches and pains throughout surveys or risk fatigue. Yoga, according to the Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, might improve quality of life by:

  • reducing stress
  • lowering heart rate and blood pressure
  • help relieve anxiety
  • depression
  • insomnia
  • improve overall physical fitness, strength, and flexibility

With these issues in mind, one can conclude that yoga helps eliminate fatigue, just as researchers should avoid fatiguing their participants.

There is a reason why almost 10 percent of Americans have turned to yoga. Many people like me in high-stress jobs tend to turn to this as a method to reduce stress and to add to their overall physical fitness.  There are claims after claims that yoga helps connect oneself with the world, and part of that world may involve sessions of meditative market research.

Study Reveals Consumer Resistance to Apple Watch

Apple Watch has been revealed but there is consumer resistance according to study

When it comes to making the release of a product into a cultural celebration, no company compares to Apple. This certainly translates to the release of the Apple Watch. CEO Tim Cook recently made the case on why the Apple Watch is a must-have gadget at a San Francisco event. Will this product shatter all expectations like the release of iPad, throwing cyber-egg on critic’s faces? Or will it flounder like other smart watches, perhaps going the way of the Google Glass dodo?

Data reveals that the sailing of the Apple Watch could encounter some choppy waters—as the much-touted release is still not resonating with consumers beyond Apple enthusiasts. This and more findings are highlighted in a survey qSample conducted with more than 300 panelists in the last week of February.

According to the study, the release of the Apple Watch is split between the general population:

–  41% are interested.
–  41% are not interested.
–  18% have no idea of its arrival.

Of those surveyed who prefer Apple products (31%), the interest in the Apple Watch doubles to 82%.        

The indifference from those who prefer either Android or Kindle could reflect the notion that wearable technology is not appealing, as a majority of respondents admit (39%) . Also challenging, 26% state their indifference stems from Apple Watch being too expensive (18% hold a “see and wait” attitude for the gadget).

Still, Apple’s brand will likely hold some sway. A majority of respondents (36%) believe that the Apple Watch will be superior to other smart watches, while only four percent feel the competitors produce better products. Furthermore, a majority (39%) contend that Apple is releasing this product to remain competitive in the tech industry, instead of just wanting to make a profit (26%) or exploit its loyal fan base (22%).

As for the Apple Watch itself, those who plan in purchasing it claim these reasons:

1. A new way to utilize apps and integrate with other devices (24%).
2. Wanting to be part of the latest technology (19%).
3. Other reasons  (16%).
4. I like anything Apple releases (15%).
5. Its design/fashion (9%).

(17% answered “all of the above”)

The low interest in the Apple Watch as a fashion brand could be further problematic. Apple is diverging from its “affordable luxury” marketing philosophy, offering some models at a retail of up to $10,000. In the online survey, 50% of respondents state they would not pay more than the baseline price of $350. Only 13% of respondents claim that price was not an issue, potentially leaving it in danger of becoming a niche product like Google Glass.

Adding to the seemingly indecision of consumers for the Apple Watch, a majority of those surveyed who are interested (36%) have no idea as to what type of Apple Watch they will purchase (between the Watch, Watch Sport, and Edition Watch). When it comes to the success of the actual product, the results are a bit more split with the panel: 47% believe the Apple Watch will not be a permanent staple for mobile devices, and 38% deem it will be.

In the online survey, a majority of participants were female (57%), while a majority (37%) fall in the 51-65 age group (odd since Apple as a brand is notably considered to attract a younger generation).

As mentioned, Apple certainly possesses the track record to rewrite trends and expectations. It was Steve Jobs who famously said that customers don’t know what they want; they have to be taught what they want. This attitude certainly paid dividends with such products as the Mac, iPod, iPhone and iPad. Will it work with the Apple Watch?

It is too soon to tell, but the study points to Apple having some hurdles to overcome, mainly an apathy towards wearable technology and a consumer base not fully informed. This time, though, it will not have Jobs to educate the consumer. That also could be an issue—as in the study 80% of respondents think Jobs is a superior CEO than Cook.

Perhaps Cook will have to sell himself before selling the Apple Watch.

Study reveals consumer resistance to Apple Watch

 

Spoiling Spot: Holiday Gifts for Pets

Considering buying a Christmas stocking for your cat/dog? No need to question your sanity, you are far from alone.

The overwhelming majority of pet owners say they treat their dogs and cats like family. Pet owners are projected to spend more than $5.5 billion on pet related gifts this holiday season, which is close to 10 percent of the total amount consumers are projected to spend on their pets.

To gain further insight into such an astounding consumer trend, qSample conducted a survey among more than 350 participants from qSample’s own Pet Owner Panel.

According to the results, 38 percent of respondents plan to spend $21-$50 on their pet this holiday. Nearly 20 percent plan on spending more than $51 on their companion’s gift.

Retailers have certainly taken notice of the increase in spending. With each passing year, owners can choose from more and more pet products and gifts. New trends, highlighted by the American Pet Product Association, include new offerings from retailers that have been focused on human products. Companies like Ralph Lauren (now selling dog sweaters), Omaha Steaks (new steak pet treats), and Paul Mitchell (new pet hygiene products).

The majority of respondents, 37 percent planned to purchase toys and 22 percent will buy a toy that distributes food or treats.  When purchasing food or treats, 37 percent say that the number one factor in their purchasing decision is whether their pet likes the product or not, 28 percent look for organic, all-natural or grain-free options, 13 percent look at brand name as their key determinant and 12 percent consider pricing first.

Most of the survey’s respondents, 49 percent, planned to purchase these gifts at a physical pet specialty store. 19 percent plan to purchase online and 11 percent will purchase from auction sites, veterinary clinics, pet shelters/rescue groups or another venue.

by Connor Duffey

 

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